Program Requirements

BM program requires the completion of 120 semester credits in order to graduate with the degree.

Core Courses

Core Courses (60 Credits total)

• Music Theory I-IV
• Solfège I-IV
• Music History Survey I-IV
• Career Study
• Degree Recital
• Applied Instrumental Studies

Performance Courses (14 credits total)

• 1-3 cr each course

Music Theory/ History Elective Courses (16 credits total)

• 3-4 cr each course

General Studies Courses (30 credits total)

• 3-4 cr each course


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Course Descriptions

Performance Courses (14 credits total)

• 1-3 cr each course

Music Theory/ History Elective Courses (16 credits total)

• 3-4 cr each course

General Studies Courses (30 credits total)

• 3-4 cr each course


Performance Courses (14 credits total)

• 1-3 cr each course

Music Theory/ History Elective Courses (16 credits total)

• 3-4 cr each course

General Studies Courses (30 credits total)

• 3-4 cr each course


Music Theory I: MT101(2 cr): Music theory is a study of musical language on various level. Music Theory I covers topics that are most fundamental and basic in nature to provide solid foundation for entering students. As the first of a series of four consecutive courses required of all music majors, it is designed to obtain essential syntax of music structure. Students are to acquire written music theory fundamentals and apply such fundamentals for the construction of two-part species counterpoint and four-part tonal writing and analysis, and analysis of modulation and phrase structure. Introduction to formal analysis will be the concluding topic of the course.

Music Theory II: MT102 (2 cr): Further study in more complex language of harmonies and phrase structures exemplified in diatonic and chromatic chord progressions. Shifting from the basic fundamentals, application of of the learned fundamentals in analysis will be the main goal. Prerequisite: MT101
Music Theory III: MT201 (2 cr): Students will focus on analysis of larger works from late Common Practice Period with complex harmonic structures dominated by chromatic chord progressions and liberal compositional structures.Borrowed chords, altered dominants, Neapolitan 6 chords as well as Augmented 6th chords will be the dominating tools used in various analysis. Prerequisite: MT102

Music Theory IV: MT202 (2cr): Continuation of analysis of large works from late- Romantic period will be followed by study of 20th century compositional techniques, each representing its own stylistic genre of Impressionism, Expressionism, Atonality, Neo-Classicism, Pandiatonicism, Polytonality, Modality, and the Second Viennese School (12-tone). Prerequisite: MT201

Solfège I: MT103 (2 cr): The basic necessity in becoming matured musician is that one must be proficient in being able to read, write, and sing musical notes. Solfège is a method of reading and singing music notes to heighten our senses in aural comprehension of sounds, and this course if the first of a series of four consecutive courses required of all music majors to acquire such skills. Students will learn to develop their inner hearing by practicing interval relations and chord progressions and will be able to dictate music notes that are being heard. Topics are: major and minor intervals and scales, root position triads, and simple melodic patterns.

Solfège II: MT104 (2 cr):
Further study in developing aural skills. Topics are: major and minor intervals, all qualities of triads in root and inversions, simple to moderate melodic patterns. Prerequisite: MT103
Solfège III: MT203 (2 cr): Further study in developing aural skills. Topics are: compound intervals, 7th chords and inversions, modes, and complex rhythms with melodic and non-melodic patterns. Topics studied previously will be continuously reviewed. Prerequisite: MT104

Solfège IV: MT204 (2 cr): Further study in developing aural skills. Topics are: cadences, Neapolitan and augmented 6th chords, whole-tone and octatonic scales. Topics studied previously will be continuously reviewed. Prerequisite: MT203
Music History Survey I: MH101 (2 cr): An introduction to the periods of Western music history, spanning from the time of Ancient Greece to the current period. The course will focus on the musical period of Medieval to Renaissance. Development and evolution of music notation, polyphony, modal theory, musical forms will be discussed along with examples from works by composers of the time. Music is heavily influenced by cultural history; social and theoretical ideas will be introduced.

Music History Survey II: MH102 (2 cr): The study of early Baroque period with reminiscence of the Renaissance practice--large choral works shifting to instrumental variety leading up to the end of brief Classical/Rococo era. Development of music theory and performance practices will be discussed along with examples from works by composers of the time.
Music History Survey III: MH201 (2 cr): Covers period roughly from 1800 to 1900. Brief review of the end of Classical era, focusing on the gradual shift into more emotional expression of individual ideals. Cross-over composers, such as Beethoven, will be discussed through his early to mid works, highlighting the cultural and social influences. Cultural and social influences define the Romantic period not only in the genre of music, but arts in general.
Music History Survey IV:MH202 (2 cr): Covers from 1900 to the present day. Dominating geographical influence from the previous era starts to loosen its grip due to development and easing of distance travel in late 19th century Europe. Extension of tonal harmonies; starting with foreign influence of American jazz music, composers starts to seek creative outlet in post-tonal harmonies. Introduction of Second Viennese school and its 12-tone systems; the rise of neo-classicism as a counterpart to the avant- garde movement. Minimalism and a new genre - film music - exemplifies the influence of modern technological development.

Career Study: ME400 (2 cr): An introduction to the "business" side of the music profession. Preparation and better understanding of how to prepare for the life after undergraduate study whether in further academic study in graduate school or as a freelancing musician. Discussions revolve around a variety of topics, including résumés, publicity photos, finding management, dealing with contracts, and taxes. Registration offered to students in the final year of study at OCCM.

Applied Instrumental Studies: MPA100, 200, 300, 400 (4 cr): Individual private lesson in each student’s performance medium. Students must strive to develop musical, technical, and analytical skills, musical memory, mental discipline, and public performance skills. One hour private instruction with one studio class and two warm- up/technique class sessions per week. The course number denotes the year of study at OCCM. Degree Recital (2 cr): Required of all graduating seniors. Recital program must be approved by the faculty. Students must pass a recital jury 3 weeks prior to event date. The recital will be adjudicated by 3 faculties.

Performance Courses:

Chamber Music: MP106 (2 cr): Chamber music is a study and performance of music for multiple instrument medium; duet, trio, quartet, quintet and small mixed ensemble. Students will receive weekly coaching by the assigned instructor on works selected for the semester, preparing for the recital at the end of the semester. Ensemble: MP308 (2 cr): Study of canonical masterworks from the Western art music tradition through rehearsal and performance. Emphasis is put upon the development of good ensemble playing techniques, nurturing performance of exceptional quality. Musical expressivity is the fundamental of all coursework. Seating placement will be determined by audition. Class rehearsals will be lead by a conductor. Performance at the end of a semester.
Collaborative Piano: MP200 (1 cr): Designed to strengthen pianist’s skills in accompanying and collaborative musicianship. Skill set required of accompanist and collaborative musician differs from that of a soloist; aural comprehension and full understanding of collaborating musical parts are crucial. Attaining instrumental knowledge of collaborating partner as well as his/her performance style must take priority over pianist’s urge for self expression.
Instrumental Literature: MP103, MP203 (3 cr): Exploration of many of the major instrumental works considered ‘standard’ in the world of music instrumentalist. Standard repertoire from Baroque to 20th century and beyond will be reviewed through listening recorded works with various interpretation of composers’ intent; studying and analyzing of the musical scores; researching the historical values and backgrounds; and the actual performances by students enrolled for the course. MP103 focuses on Baroque- Classical period, and MP203 focuses on Romantic-early 20th century, offered alternately every Fall. MP103 is not a prerequisite for MP203.

Piano Seminar: MP304 (3 cr): Presentations and masterclasses by guest artist and OCCM faculty, as well as discussion for seminar members. Focus on various aspects of performances including concert/performance etiquette, stage presence, interpretation and artistry, performance anxiety, and managing recital details in addition to masterclasses. Orchestra Repertoire: Classical to Mid-Romantic: MP105 (1 cr): Study of orchestral repertoire is a lifelong undertaking for instrumental musicians. The precise tempo, the pitch, the speed, and the impeccable technique must always be upheld. The course is a study and practice of orchestral music with intention of preparation for various orchestral position auditions. We will study standard excerpts with thorough understanding of the full orchestral score, focusing on repertoire ranging from Classical to -Romantic period. Mock audition will conclude the course at the end of the semester. Orchestra Repertoire: Mid-Romantic to Early-20th Century: MP205 (1 cr): Further study of orchestral excerpts, focusing on repertoire ranging from mid-Romantic to early 20th century period. Mock audition will conclude the course at the end of the semester. MP105 is not a prerequisite for this course.

General Education:

Basics of Finance for Musicians: GE400 (4 cr): Unlike corporate business employee, life of musician is required to have financial knowledge specific to self- employment as employment positions in the business are of freelancing up to small- business scale. Students will learn to utilize excel to build a mathematical formula for project budget proposal, create financial reports, calculate sample business projections using formula, and understand income tax and other various financial planning terminology. Prerequisite: GE200
College Algebra: GE200 (4 cr): Begins with brief rudimentary review of mathematical skills needed to successfully complete College Algebra. College Algebra will emphasize student preparation, critical thinking, and problem solving, providing fundamental concepts of mathematic often needed in other area of study.

College Writing Seminar: GE100 (3 cr): Required of all entering students. Large part of being college student require writing. Since many of the techniques of academic research writing are common to other forms of writing, students will read widely and deeply from variety of texts in addition to research articles, including personal essays, treatises, newspaper articles, manifestos, lectures, textbook excerpts, science writing, letters, and more. Doing so will allow students to identify and extract techniques, styles, and rhetorical devices that students may wish to employ in their own writing. Fundamentals of Website Development: GE300 (4 cr): Introduces the basic foundational skills in design, creation and maintenance of the web pages and websites, utilizing critical thinking in understanding the layered construction of internet infrastructure. Skills acquired will be applied to the planning, designing, and development of student’s own portfolio website to market freelancing musicians. Introduction to Astronomy: GE201 (4cr): How large is the universe? How old is it? Did it have a beginning, and if so, how old is it? Will it have an end? How did the Earth form and how did life originate? These are the most fundamental questions deeply rooted in the science of astronomy. In this course, students will delve into these deep mysteries. Discussion on what modern astronomers have learned about the nature of the universe, as well as what additional mysteries have been uncovered. Prerequisite: GE200

Introduction to the Comparative Literature: GE301 (4 cr): An introduction to the study of world literature with consideration of social, economic, political and religious influence. Topics to be addressed are; the role of language and literature in different culture and historical periods; the function of oral and written literatures in different cultural contexts; the role of literary representation in constructing racial, gender, class, ethnic, and national identity; problems involved in the translation and interpretation of literary texts; and economic and political issues as they relate to literary production. Understanding Poetry: GE101 (4 cr): Poetry is the one of the oldest forms of literary production, yet modern forms of media like novel, film, television, and other hybrid forms, have replaced poetry as dominant cultural forms of literary and aesthetic discourse. In this age of instant gratification, its intricate construction and attention to

language, detail, and form, have perhaps become antiquated. The course aims to decipher such ‘mysteries’ in understanding poetry. It will introduce ‘how’ to ready and analyze poetry while aiming at sharpening your skills in critical thinking and writing. Philosophical Foundations of Education: GE401 (4 cr): Examination of the educational system in the United States, incorporating the historical, political, economic, sociological, philosophical, legal, and curricular foundations. Significant portion of the course will be spend on the curricular emphasis, preferred method, ethics, and aesthetics stressed by each philosophy.

Music Theory and Music History Electives:

Introduction to Post-Tonal Theory: MT303 (3 cr): Post-tonal theory is a study and understanding of non-tonal music, mainly arising in the early 20th century. As the exploration of tonal harmony reached exhaustion at the end of 19th century, composers started to seek differing medium in harmony, presenting analytic tools that are theoretical and avant-garde in nature. Topics will include cyclic, set, serial, contour, and transformational theories. Prerequisite: Completion of core Music Theory courses Introduction to Schenkerian Analysis: MT304 (3 cr): Theorist and pedagogue, Heinrich Schenker (1868-1935)’s reduction approach in analyzing music offers hierarchical approach to musical listening and performance. His analysis method gives a tool for musicians for understanding the basic fundamental construction of music in a linear movement. The concept of reduction and background structure, with tools of technique such as prolongation, unfolding, compound voicing, offers an alternate analytical approach to understanding the compositional structure from the mainstream harmonic analysis. Prerequisite: Completion of core Music Theory courses Counterpoint I: MT301 (3 cr): Counterpoint is a study of contrapuntal practice in which skills in writing melodies are learned through fixed rules. This course focuses on the study of the practice of 16th century modal counterpoint. Understanding of the contrapuntal element in all musical styles are essential in fully understanding musical content, and by exploring the forces of tension and relaxation, direction and musical climax, students will learn to imitate to compose in styles of Renaissance and early- Baroque period. Various rules in species counterpoint and stylistic counterpoint as found in the sacred vocal polyphony of such masters of the period as Palestrina, Victoria, and Lasso will be studied and imitated. Prerequisite: Completion of core Music

Counterpoint II: MT302 (3 cr): Focus on the study of contrapuntal practice of 18th century counterpoint, mainly works of J.S. Bach and his compositional styles. Theoretical text from treatise by pedagogues and prolific composers of the period will be studied. Unlike the previous Renaissance era, what is considered consonance and dissonance significantly vary. Composition of two-, three-, and four-voice chorale preludes, binary dances, inventions, and fugue will be studied and imitated. Prerequisite: Completion of core Music Theory courses

Introduction to World Music: MH300 (4 cr): Introduction of various scholarly study of traditional music from around the world and their incorporation into western classical music today. Explores the connections of music to identify, migration, globalization, personal and community memory, and politics and power. Prerequisite: Completion of Music History Survey I-IV

Women in Music: MH400 (4 cr): Historical and analytical survey of female roles throughout the western music history, covering middle ages through present day. Roles of women throughout the western music history are generally categorized into two parts; women as patrons and audience, and women as composers. Topics to be covered are; representations of female and gender in music works; feminist music criticism; performances of gender in stage works, concerts, and in the media; and the works and lives of female composers. Prerequisite: Completion of Music History Survey I-IV