Minako Horimura
B.M., Toho Gakuen University
M.M., Eastman School of Music


Ms. Horimura was born in Sendai, Japan into a musical family. With her pianist mother at her side, she grew up surrounded by musicians; the music-rich environment encouraged her music growth from an early age.

Ms. Horimura began her musical training at the age of five at Toho Gakuen School of Music for Children where she began performing in numerous concerts and masterclasses. At the age of 13, she won the national division of Japan Piano Teacher’s Association Competition, performing at the Winner’s Gala concert. At the age of 15, she was accepted with full scholarship to study at Tokiwagi High School as a piano performance major where she graduated with the highest honor.

Upon graduation from Toho Gakuen School of Music in Tokyo with a Bachelor of Music in Piano Performance under the tutelage of Emeritus Professor Cheko Okabayashi in 2001, Ms. Horimura subsequently attended a summer festival in Hamamatsu, Japan where she met Thomas Schumacher, a renowned professor from Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York.  With his strong recommendation, Ms. Horimura moved to to the United States to pursue her graduate study with Professor Schumacher at Eastman School of Music where she had received Howard Hanson Scholarship.

Ms. Horimura’s orchestra performances include American Wind Symphony Orchestra (2002) and Miyagi University Orchestra (2007), and she was also a replacement for a rehearsal pianist for Andre Watts at American Youth Symphony Orchestra. Aside from her orchestra performances, Ms. Horimura has performed numerous chamber music concerts with distinguished artists such as Nobuo Furukawa of Tokyo Metropolitan Orchestra and members of NHK Symphony Orchestra.


Ms. Horimura believes that music education is for everyone regardless of socio cultural-economic status, physical, or intellectual level. Everyone should receive an equal opportunity to experience and to be exposed to music and art. Her teaching philosophy is that practicing is everything. However, practice does not make perfect. Only ‘perfect practice” makes perfect; along with the ‘perfect practice’, hard work, sacrifice, dedication, and being humble are key in success in music performance.

Aside from her appointment at Opus119 as a piano faculty, Ms. Horimura is currently an adjunct collaborative pianist faculty at Chapman University and an staff accompanist at Foothill High School in Tustin, California.